Amway is probably the most widely used of the "sell our products out of the comfort of your own home and be your own boss!" services, the ones that appeal to the unemployed with promises they'll get rich quick (and also encourages them to relentlessly recruit new members). And on the surface it looks fairly plausible, especially when you look at how much money Amway rakes in every year: in 2014 Amway sold $10.8 billion worth of products, so why shouldn't you try to break off a piece of that action?
WHAT IS YOUR DREAM? demanded a booming voice. The ballroom went dark and the audience settled in for a fifteen minute video catalogue of the stuff dreams are made of: a blur of luxury cars, sprawling mansions, frolicking children, pristine beaches, hot-dogging jet-skiers, private helipads, and zooming jets—all set to caffeinated, John-Teshy instrumental music. The voice returned: “It’s about family!” (A shot of kids collapsing on an oceanic lawn, love-tackled by Dad.) “It’s about security!” (A shot of a palatial house.) “It’s about you!” (A close-up of toes, gently lapped by the incoming tide, wriggling in white sand.)
The other way that you can quickly judge Amway is by the profile of their members. Many come from lower middle class religious backgrounds and have recently undergone personal issues (e.g. marital struggles) or boredom that cause them to look for some job that offers an easy way in and a holistic form of management. Many are unwilling to either put in the time that accompanies developing an actual profession (and will thus scoff at higher education) or put in the risk that accompanies creating one’s own business (and will thus scoff at how much the average person works per day.) They’ll often use trigger terms such as “early retirement,” “success,” and “freedom” without ever actually offering anything of substance of what Amway consists of. If anyone questions them – instead of taking time to explain how exactly Amway operates, they will point to a small group of people they know that got rich using Amway or point to all of the businesses that “partner” with Amway . Finally, some are often very protective and defensive of Amway online. You’ll see throughout the comments here (and countless others on blogs criticizing Amway) persons of such stature. You’ll also see that these persons, more often than not, use extremely poor grammar and punctuation, use profanity, and will almost never give an actual counter-argument of substance (but will rather point towards the businesses that partner with Amway, attack other businesses, or direct you to some site ran by Amway members.) Go ahead and see how many of the pro-Amway comments in this blog fit these traits – all of them.
Amway has phenomenal products, with a low startup cost. You make excellent margins on products 20-40%. You get excellent business training and sales/product training with the Britt System. The atmosphere is always positive, negativity is not allowed. You build great relationships and friendships. It becomes a franchise environment with support from an entire team and business system. You can purchase products at a heavily discounted price. You can expand your business in over 80+ countries world wide.

While the whirlwind of meetings and events were great for cultivating denial, they seemed to do little to help distributors develop “strong and profitable businesses.” Nor were they much good for attracting new blood into The Business. With the exception of First Looks, their extreme cultishness was distinctly off-putting to newcomers. Still, Josh, Jean, and Sherri continued to make the mistake of indiscriminately taking prospects to whatever meeting was going on. Even a Second Look (described ominously as more “motivational” and less informational than a First Look) was inadvisable for outsiders, as Sherri discovered when she took her friend Elizabeth to one.
This collective approach is how the family runs their home lives, too. The DeVoses’ myriad properties are managed through a single private company, RDV Corporation, which both manages the family’s investments and operates as a home office, paying the family’s employees, maintaining the DeVoses’ residences and assuring them as frictionless a life as possible. (The duties outlined by one recent property-manager job with RDV Corporation include “ensur[ing] doors are well-oiled to avoid squeaking” and that “broken toys [are] repaired or disposed of.”)
It's not for nothing that you see 20% of the people in this world are leading 80%. Because 80% of people don't dare have a big dreams and overcome challenges. That's why they can live a great life, because they did something. So keep working for them and have an average salary and live your average life. Compare yourself to your boss. It's not for nothing that he is the only boss in his company leading 250 other people. It's just because he could vision himself bigger. Stay in the trap by yourself, who cares. It's your life. You can live it as awesome as you want or as miserable as you want. But there will still be dreamers out there who will lead you at the age of 65 when you can't retire because your retirement paycheck is too low. Because they will dare do something that you are not smart enough to take the risk to do. And enjoy your paycheck. They will enjoy their wonderful lifestyle. You will still have 15 vacation days to stay at home, they will take vacation whenever they want and travel all around the world. After all, if there was not people like you, your boss would not make any money. Wish you luck... I am an IBO and I LOVE AMWAY.
In 2013, eSpring was one of the Reader's Digest Trusted Brands Award winners in the water purifiers category in Malaysia.[62] In 2015, Amway was recognized for the sixth consecutive year by Frost & Sullivan as Asia Pacific Water Filtration company of the year.[55] According to an Amway commissioned study of global sales conducted by marketing research firm Verify Markets, eSpring was the world's largest selling brand of kitchen water treatment systems and home water treatment systems in 2014.[63]
Rallies begin with a ritual called “crossing the stage,” in which distributors who have attained a new bonus level go up to receive their commemorative pin and shake hands with a Diamond. From the crowd of about five hundred, two couples “crossed” at the 1,000 PV level (the lowest warranting a pin) and received a standing ovation from the audience. From the stage, the host then called out all the levels from 1,500 PV to 7,500 PV. Nobody emerged from the audience—which, nonetheless, remained on its feet applauding. The host kept cajoling, “C’mon, there’s plenty of room up here,” as if it were shyness that was keeping people away. It was the archetypal Amway moment: a crowd giving a standing ovation to nobody.

Earlier in 1949, DeVos and Van Andel had formed the Ja-Ri Corporation (abbreviated from their respective first names) to import wooden goods from South American countries. After the Chicago seminar, they turned Ja-Ri into a Nutrilite distributorship instead.[17] In addition to profits on each product sold, Nutrilite offered commissions on sales made by new distributors introduced to the company by existing distributors—a system known as multi-level marketing or network marketing. By 1958, DeVos and Van Andel had built an organization of more than 5,000 distributors. However, they and some of their top distributors formed the American Way Association, or Amway, in April 1959 in response to concerns about the stability of Nutrilite and in order to represent the distributors and look for additional products to market.[18]

Hi Ben. LTD is a Line of Association or approved provider, not a company. LTD has no rights to require you to purchase any business materials. Everything offered by LTD is optional to IBOs due to the Rules of Conduct which is approved by federal government. But I believe LTD is a really nice LOA, because I know some really intelligent LTD leaders. Amway would not suspend your business for no reasons, because it's not benefitial to Amway either. And the arbitration company you talk about is called Independent Business Owner Association International, which is a non-profit association previously named as American Way Association founded in 1959, not company either. All the IBOAI Board Directors are elected from Diamond IBOs and above by votes from Platinum and above. If you have conflicts with Amway, you may appear for an infromal and formal hearing conciliation in IBOAI, which is held by IBOAI Board Directors not Amway administrators. And the IBOAI will stand out for IBOs' benefits, not Amway's. Amway usually accept IBOAI's recommendation for the results of hearing conciliations. You must understand that Rules of Conduct was writting by both Amway Rules Dept and IBOAI directors, and approved by government. That means the content in the Rules is legal and obeying the Federal Laws and the spirit of the Contitution. Amway has to fight you by the rules, and IBOAI will help you fight back by the rules. However, if you break the rules, nobody can help you. Is this the reason why you wrote your comment like this? And you know what, you can sue Amway Corp, because I know someone who did it and won the case. It has proved that this business has helped a lot of people earning extra income or achieving dreams without violating the Rules Of Conduct. And if your upline overcommitted you something, please don't blame it on this business and other IBOs in this business. Nobody should tell you that you only need 10 hours a week to be successful, nobody can make this statement, and nobody should believe it. I strongly suggest you to contact with me, and I would like to show you what a correct approch to Amway Business is. And I still believe you may find a way to make extra income in this business.
Attaining goals for greater success and profitability depends on each distributor’s ability to sponsor other distributors, who comprise their ‘downline.’ Patience is a characteristic much required in this step because a distributor can advance in profitability and standing only to the extent that the downline distributors actually sell products and keep on generating volume.

Enter Jay Van Andel, Amway’s other cofounder. Jay had a 1929 Model A, which Rich had noticed both driving down his street and also parked outside his high school. ‘I thought a ride in this car would surely beat the bus, a streetcar, or walking,’ says Rich. The rest is as saccharine as you would expect: good American boys working hard to make their dreams come true – an adventure full of family values and sturdy bootstraps with which one can pull himself up. It begins with the heartwarming story of their first joint business venture, running a pilot school, then segues into a comedy-of-errors trip on a sailboat – a typical masculine coming-of-age experience rooted in good old-fashioned American values like cooperation, perseverance, and leadership.

Amway is not a scam. The reason why people fail to be successful is because it is hard work just like any other business and not because it is a scam. Good people skills is a must for this kind of business and definitely, you need to be intelligent and clever in marketing your products just like in any other business. A lot of people fail in this business because they have little idea about money making skills or business skills. I have worked in corporate and I know the common thing among all the companies in the world is that they exaggerate about products, the lifestyle you will get and the money you will make. ALL companies do that. The only difference is that in Amway you are not sitting in a company building for your work. Rest depends on your selling skills. 
And these inconveniences pale beside the emotional shock of entering Josh and Jean’s apartment. Not big to begin with, its thorough occupation by Amway Corporation made it positively claustrophobic. The living room was dominated by huge metal cabinets displaying Amway cleaning and food products; shelves along the wall were devoted to toiletries; boxes of cereal lined the top of the couch. Next to the window was an eraser board listing upcoming World Wide Dreambuilders meetings; free wall space and the outside of cabinets were decorated with motivational slogans (“I AM A WINNER!”) drawn in crayon.
i am a pediatrician from pune, India & i personally know so many poor people ( ex.- a riksha driver – santosh gaikwad, a tyre puncture shop person- bhumkar, a truck driver- vilas ghule , javeri- student & so many ) have changed their life through amway business…. all earning more than Rs. 70000 per month income… so many from other higher professionals also ( Rakshit Bhardwaj sir- vice president-IT company ).. i have no. of examples ( can’t write in detail)

In 2004, Dateline NBC aired a report, alleging that some high-level Quixtar IBOs make most of their money from selling motivational materials rather than Quixtar products.[49] Quixtar published an official Quixtar Response website[50] where it showed '"Interviews Dateline Didn't Do"'. Quixtar also states on its response site that Dateline declined their request to link to the site.
As its hands reached “midnight,” the Rolex dissolved into a series of video montages depicting the consumer Shangri-La that our own forthcoming Amway success would open for us. We leered as a day in the life of a typical jobholder—all alarm clocks, traffic jams, and dingy cubicles—was contrasted with that of an Amway distributor, who slept in and lounged the day away with his family. We gawked hungrily as real-life Amway millionaires strutted about sprawling estates (proudly referred to as “family compounds”) and explained that such opulence was ours for the asking. We chortled as a highway patrolman stopped an expensive sports car for speeding—only to ride away a moment later with an Amway sample kit strapped to his motorcycle. Our laughter became a roar of delight as the camera zoomed in on the sports car’s bumper sticker: “JOBLESS … AND RICH!” 

It may come as a surprise to Jessica and Richard, but 50% of all people are below average. IBOs are successful only if they exploit those that are feeble minded enough to buy Amway's crappy products: i.e cleaning products loaded up with salt. No ethical person would consider doing this. If the average IBO income is only about $200 and the median a lot less ~$30, then the scam is obvious! Perhaps Richard and Jessica always load up on Lotto tickets because the potential return is huge. Richard loves to focus on the good stuff and gets blinded by the false hope. Don't be a sucker, MLM is a scam.
In a breakfast speech to volunteers at Holland Christian Schools on May 12, 1975, Ed Prince warned that lazy and neglectful U.S. citizens were not doing their fair share, forcing the government to, as a Holland Sentinel article described it, “play an increasingly larger role in our daily and personal lives.” (You don’t have to listen too hard to hear an echo of Ed Prince in his daughter, Betsy. “[For welfare recipients] to sit and be handed money from the government because they think a job like that is beneath them,” the heiress sighed to the Detroit Free Press in 1992. “If I had to work on a line in a factory, I would do that before I would stand in line for a welfare check.”)
i’ve been to events, i attend meetings, i buy and use the products (but only the ones i actually like, like some of the kid vitamins cuz my kid actually really likes ’em, and their makeup/skincare i really like because it works for my skin)….there has never been one mention about “ditching your family or friends”, there has never been any pressure to buy nothing but Amway….
Last night we attended the JT concert and had the worst experience ever. First, I was told we couldn...’t take in our small camera, even after I spoke to supervisor. They wanted us to bring it back to the car!! I had to show them the email blast from Amway that said small, non professional cameras were allowed. Need better training for your staff. 2nd, all the floor bars ran out of bud light and then all domestic beers in can and on tap. What a joke. It was a Monday night and a concert for adults. Lastly, the sound was terrible for the show, bathrooms a mess. For the money we pay for concerts, you need to do a better job!! See More
My husband rides in the front of the golf cart with Dale; I ride in the back. We strike out over the gently rolling fairways. ‘We’re a longer course,’ says Dale. ‘Total length, if you play from back tees, seventy-one hundred yards. No one, not even the younger guys, play from the tips. I’m just going to show you the prettiest part and then head back so we stay dry.’

And these inconveniences pale beside the emotional shock of entering Josh and Jean’s apartment. Not big to begin with, its thorough occupation by Amway Corporation made it positively claustrophobic. The living room was dominated by huge metal cabinets displaying Amway cleaning and food products; shelves along the wall were devoted to toiletries; boxes of cereal lined the top of the couch. Next to the window was an eraser board listing upcoming World Wide Dreambuilders meetings; free wall space and the outside of cabinets were decorated with motivational slogans (“I AM A WINNER!”) drawn in crayon.


My husband rides in the front of the golf cart with Dale; I ride in the back. We strike out over the gently rolling fairways. ‘We’re a longer course,’ says Dale. ‘Total length, if you play from back tees, seventy-one hundred yards. No one, not even the younger guys, play from the tips. I’m just going to show you the prettiest part and then head back so we stay dry.’

President Gerald R. Ford, a native of Grand Rapids, was one of Mr. DeVos’s friends. Mr. DeVos also advised Presidents Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush. He was a member of Reagan’s AIDS commission and helped develop the weekly presidential radio address when he agreed to carry Reagan’s Saturday noon broadcasts on the Mutual Broadcasting System, which was then owned by Amway.


The top four teams remained the same, with No. 1 Alabama continuing to receive 61 of 64 first-place votes after the Crimson Tide cruised past Arkansas. Georgia retained the No. 2 spot after taking down Vanderbilt. No. 3 Ohio State overcame a sluggish start to put away Indiana and retained one No. 1 vote. Fourth-ranked Clemson, retaining two No. 1 nods, also held steady after its most lopsided result of the season at Wake Forest.
This one sits on a double executive lot. An artificial creek snakes around the yard. Flashes of yellow and orange spotted koi pass beneath our feet as we approach from the brick walkway. The house is split-level with two wings, a custom pool with cascading waterfall, billiard room, media room, workout room, steam room, six-car garage, state-of-the-art workshop, custom built-in bar, loft for quiet relaxation, hurricane shutters, large views of the golf course – and two bedrooms above the garage sequestered for the help.
 I'm sure that the success stories I heard were all true. The problem is that they build an unrealistic expectation of what is possible.  People hear these rags to riches tales and think 'hey that could be me'.  Unfortunately very few of them will ever make any money at all.  Even fewer will achieve financial freedom from Amway   Joining Amway is extremely easy, making a profit in Amway is extremely difficult.
Usually in such sophisticated and well orchestrated system, all the investors & family members of the organizers (forerunners) place themselves into the tree such that they form the initial 7 or 8 levels at the top. With just 200 members, their tree is already 8 levels complete. Next, they start referring friends who form the 9th level. The 9th level requires 2^9 = 512 members. Now the exponential function starts showing its real colors. For the 10th level, you need 1024 new members. By the time it reaches your neighborhood, it might be in the 15th level and that level alone has 32,768 members. To add another level into it, it needs 65,536 new people. Just to give you an idea, in order to add the 25th level, you need 33 crore (330 million) new members into the system and you already have 33 crores (330 million) inside the system (number of nodes in a tree of height N is 1 less than ‘2 power N+1’).
I got sucked into this program only to find out to get started you have to spend $300 in your store each month. This wouldn't be so bad if I wasn't stuck part-time at Wal-Mart. I could flex my schedule to fit my mentor's just fine, I already thought the way they want you to in the first place, and I welcomed learning new things but I just couldn't afford it and no one is going to help you because they're all trying to make their own business succeed. Then I tried talking to my mentor and he seemed more selfish than anything. I would have to starve myself on perfect water and protein bars and he only thought about how me leaving would affect HIM. I hate people, always will and this just made my social seclusion worse. If you are reading this to because you just got dragged into too, don't follow through with it unless you have extra money to throw around. I was also learning nothing I didn't already know. And you'll always hear people saying "Well if you knew how, why aren't you successful like us?" Well my answer is because I haven't tried yet. Every meeting you hear the exact same things. I even had the infortunity to go to this year's Spring Leadership. The most interesting part of it was the band at the very beginning. Every person had the same thing to say, the only diversity is how they got to where they are now. My mentor is extremely unequipped to teach anyone. He may have been mentored by the most famous Diamonds in Edmonton but in two years he's not even Eagle.

Hi Christene! Former Amway IBO here. Why didn't you talk about the Amway training companies such as LTD in your review? New IBO's will be encouraged (required) to buy their products/services by their uplines. Why don't you talk about the IBO contract? It has both non compete and arbitration clauses in it. That means you can't sue, if you have a dispute you have to go to an arbitration company that favors Amway. Also, Amway can end your IBO at any time for any reason. Again, your only recourse is the arbitration company that depends on Amway for its business. The average IBO income is only about $200. That's the average, I think the median is a lot lower. I was told that IBO's only need to put in 10 hours a week to be successful. Given the average income, that means that the average Amway IBO makes less than minimum wage for his/her time. My conclusion is that you would be better off getting a paper route than becoming an IBO.
Amway was founded in 1959 by two fellows by the name of Richard DeVos and Jay Van Andel who are based in Michigan.  Today Amway do business through number of companies all around the world (More than eighty countries).  In 2012 Amway was actually rewarded the number 25 position by Forbes for being one of the largest private companies in the United States.  In fact, more than $11 billion dollars with of sales were recorded, making Amway one of the most successful Direct sales or network marketing companies that have been in business for well over 50 years.
And the victims of MLMs—that is, the people who pay high buy-in fees but never recoup their investment—are usually women. The second episode of The Dream is called “Women’s Work,” and in it Marie returns to her hometown of Owosso, Michigan, where childhood friends and women in her family recall how Tupperware, makeup, and jewelry parties were an essential part of the town’s social fabric. “They say you can work from home, you can pick up your kids from school, you’ll never miss a soccer game,” Marie said of the promises MLMs make to women. “You can be the stereotypical mom, American mom, and make a living. Except that you can’t. You now have women doing all the emotional labor of mothering, and unpaid labor of running a household, and you have them working nights and weekends to pay for their cell phone. It’s like being in jail.”
With its affiliates around the world, Amway Global is a leader in the $80 billion global direct-selling industry. Established in 1959 as a seller of household cleaners, the company expanded and diversified over the years and today is a leader in Health and Beauty through its NUTRILITE brand of nutritional supplements and the ARTISTRY brand of skin care and cosmetics. 
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