In his memoir Simply Rich, Amway cofounder Rich DeVos tells the story of Amway’s origins. The country was in the last gasps of the Great Depression. Rich was fourteen. He was walking two miles through the snow to his high school each day, in his hometown of Grand Rapids, Michigan: wool collar popped high, galoshes squishing, wind in his face. Occasionally he would take the streetcar or city bus – but allowing time for the city bus meant having to rise long before the sun came up. ‘I needed more efficient transportation, and already being an enterprising type, I had an idea,’ he writes.

In looking at U.S. respondents’ abilities and attitudes regarding starting and running a business, the majority (88 percent) perceive themselves as socially supported (compared to 64 percent globally). When it comes to taking risks, 74 percent of U.S. respondents consider themselves to be risk-takers, compared to 47 percent of respondents globally.
Tex, Amway is legit, instead of listening to people who fail when utilizing Amway as a platform to build their asset, why don't you talk to people who were successful when signing up in Amway, it's like you and I getting gym memberships and I go to the gym everyday and you go once a week and you don't get results and I do and you tell everyone that the gym doesn't work when in actuality it was you who didn't put in the work.. Then you talk to people that utilized the same gym as you and all the people who didn't get results becomes the people you listen to the most because you have the same thinking they do. Which is small minded small business get something for nothing get results quick type mindset. Instead of listening to the long term delayed gratification hard working individuals who actually did what it took to make it work!
But it turns out to be so much more complicated. In 1979, the F.T.C., after investigating Amway, a multilevel marketing company with a vast product line, decided that the company’s business model passed muster — even though recruitment was at the heart of it — because it claimed to take certain steps that (among other things) supposedly showed that its recruits were selling the company’s products to real customers, not just to other recruits. Very quickly, other multilevel marketing companies adopted the “Amway rules” to stay on the right side of the F.T.C.
I would rather attend training that are proven success from people that I know are reputable. I have attended a meeting with a “mentor” and then the first house meeting. Not for me. I can build big business elsewhere not through this pyramid. First of all I have no problem buy the products from my own store, but they do tell you to get a whole new group of like minded people, which gurus do, that are not on your same agenda.
A 1998 analysis of campaign contributions conducted by Businessweek found that Amway, along with the founding families and some top distributors, had donated at least $7 million to GOP causes in the preceding decade.[76] Political candidates who received campaign funding from Amway in 1998 included Representatives Bill Redmond (R–N.M.), Heather Wilson (R–N.M.), and Jon Christensen (R–Neb).[74]
There’s a lot of red tape in reporting on MLMs, and as Marie says in the debut episode, “The subjects of our investigation are highly litigious.” But after months of reporting and signing up for one MLM, which sells makeup, Marie remains passionate in her belief that virtually all MLMs—including Amway, source of the DeVos family fortune—are . . . well, let’s not call them scams, exactly. “I don’t want to say that everyone involved is a scammer or a con man or whatever, but I would say that the business model is unsustainable in the regular marketplace,” Marie said. “Legitimate companies don’t work this way for a reason.”
Fittingly, my encounter with Amway began during a long-term temp assignment at Andersen Consulting’s ENTERPRISE 2020 project, an ongoing exhibit to which consultants would bring potential clients to scare them about the future. The main attraction was a battery of “industry experts” who produced customized nightmare scenarios to help manufacturing executives from across the globe see the Third Wave coming at them. The experts would discourse gravely about globalization, accelerating technology, managed chaos, self-organizing supply chains, flex-this, flex-that, and nano-everything, eventually arriving at the message of this elaborate sideshow: The future is not to be faced without an Andersen consultant on retainer.
Helmstetter credits the practice of ‘dreambuilding’ as a central reason why Amway is so successful. Dreambuilding is more than wishful thinking, Cross explains. It’s more than seeing what people with more money have and wishing you had it. Dreambuilding is ‘the perfection of excellence’ – ‘It is a way to control what you think, to enhance what you believe, and to solidify your attitude’ (emphasis his own). Most importantly, it’s a procedure, ‘a skill that has to be learned, practiced, and put into action.’
I used to be an Amway and NuSkin distributor. I think the biggest problem with this type of business now is that, everyone knows about it and have heard about it.  There are so many many companies just like this and many more coming into the market. People are just plainly sick of hearing MLM product proposals. I do see a problem with this type of business but if your committed and willing to work hard, I can see that you will be successful.  I am not one who want to continue pressuring people to buy and make the minimum purchase to get my commission.  Many fail because they value friendship over their business and they don't want to constantly hound their down-line to make their monthly quota.  
When I was ten, my parents bought a house for $200,000. My dad had been running his advertising agency out of the spare bedroom of our house on Twelfth Avenue, and when he hired his third employee, he set up a desk in my bedroom for the graphic artist to work at while I was at school. Then a neighbor called the city about all the cars parked on the street, and my parents cracked a plan to move into a bigger house and bring the agency into the new house with us. By that time, though, business had gone gangbusters, so it turned out that moving the company into the new house wasn’t necessary, after all – my dad rented an office, instead. The new house was entirely ours.
One day, Sherri asked me to attend a meeting at which a “millionaire from the West Coast” was to talk about “business trends of the nineties.” I was not entirely caught by surprise—Sherri had dropped hints about starting her own “distribution business” at about the time that Amway Dish Drops appeared in the E2020 kitchen—and although she didn’t tell me the millionaire was from Amway, it wasn’t difficult to guess which version of the gospel of wealth he’d be preaching. I jumped at the chance to meet this mysterious man of money, although from totally insincere motives—the old anthro major in me was hankering for a bona fide subculture to gawk at.
The Amwayers who had brought me to Dream Night were flying high on the drive home, whooping occasionally just to vent their exhilaration. I felt as though I had just sat through a year’s worth of infomercials, with some high school pep rallies and a few Tony Robbins lectures thrown in. But to see all this as an exercise in mass hypnosis, according to Amway’s literature, would be to “misunderstand” what is, simply, “the best business opportunity in the world”—an assessment, strangely enough, with which the rest of world is starting to agree.

According to this article, “The way that you’re actually going to make residual income is by sponsoring people into a downline. Yes, this means that you are going to need to get really good at recruiting your friends and family into the business to become an active distributor just like you.” This means that if you’re looking to make it to the top of the Amway hierarchy, you’re going to need to create a large network of IBOs underneath you, and earn a commission off of each sale they make. In other words, creating recurring monthly income occurs not necessarily by selling Amway products, but by recruiting others to sell them for you. And this simply can’t be avoided, because in order to begin selling Amway products, you’ll have to sign up under an existing IBO, who will make money off each of your sales.
Amway’s original product, Liquid Organic Cleaner (L.O.C.™), was one of the first concentrated, biodegradable and environmentally sensitive cleaning products on the market. Since then, with a similarly pioneering and purposeful spirit, Amway has gone from selling simply home products to become a global leader in health and beauty, too. For decades, the company has focused on environmentally sensitive and biodegradable products.

I am a temp there currently. I work in nutrition. Not only what the title says but the management does nothing but hassle you about little petty things that overall dont matter in the long run. If you do your research, this company sells overly expensive bs products that dont really work. They are SNAKE OIL salesmen and producers. $300 For a small thing of anti aging cream that doesnt really work. Its just placebo! $120 For a small box of "meal replacement" powder that really is just full of soy, powdered milk, and fake "natural" flavoring! They are a scamming mlm company just like younique and all the other ones. AND IF YOU DONT KNOW ALREADY AN MLM IS A PYRAMID SCHEME! The so called "independant" business owners on here are just fake reviews to peddle their "radical new protein powder :DDDDD". The work environment is absolutely terrible. Half the time the lines arent even up and when they are down they want you to clean.... even though everything has been cleaned! I LITTERALLY stood there for an hour and a half cleaning the same spot over and over as id already cleaned the whole line! You cant talk to anyone unless you want the techs to report it to your coordinator. We do it anyways as human interaction is human nature and you cant stop that. The techs WONT LET YOU use your phone if you have nothing to do but check their social media and PLAY GAMES and sit down when their line is running and they have nothing to do! They get onto us about it and its bs! These 2 individuals that keep coming back after they time out (The contract is 1 year 8 months) think that they are gods  more... gift to this green earth and think they are your boss keep causing conflict and undue stress to me and several others but they refuse to fire them because "the techs say they are good workers". I wake up half the time to go to work and puke my guts out due to the stress they put us through. I hate this place. NEVER WORK FOR AN MLM. Say hi to r/antimlm by the way.  less
Imagine that you’ve struck a deal with a company to give you discounts for buying in bulk: If you buy $100 worth of stuff, they’ll send you a 3 percent rebate. For $300 or more, it goes up to 6 percent, $600 or more, 9 percent, and so on up to $7,500 and 25 percent. Now, let’s say you’re unable to spend more than $100 a month, but manage to get seventy-four other people to go in with you. Together, you spend $7,500 and divide up the 25 percent rebate. Everyone saves money, and the rebate is shared equally. That’s the idea behind a consumer co-op or wholesale buying club.
‘We here, man,’ says a young black man in a blue T-shirt. ‘See all the IBOs. It’s good to be withpeople in your company, to feel the love. A lot of people back home be wondering how it is and how big of an organization it is. You see: just imagine the potential of having all these people in one group, man, even if you get ten dollars off a person’ – he points to a random person in the audience – ‘all these people. There’s a whole lot of money floating around in here somewhere.’
He tells us the club no longer has an initiation fee – they were forced to waive it six years ago in response to the economic downturn. ‘You have the top two or three clubs in the area – Bayou Club, Belleair Country Club, and probably Feather Sound – with no initiation fees to join,’ he says. ‘It makes it very easy to be part of a club these days.’
In early November of 2017, we were out walking around the mall. I was searching for a new pair of earrings. We were looking around in Claire's of all places when a couple approached us. The girl complimented my shoes. I said thank you, but then they struck up a conversation. They were very friendly and we enjoyed talking to them, however, we did notice they seemed oddly too friendly. We exchanged phone numbers and left happy that we made new friends. It's not easy making friends in the area we live in.
What with backorders and unexpected disappearances, it took me a few weeks to gather enough items for my next experiment: a blind taste-test pitting Amway food against brands from “communist” supermarkets. Unfortunately, biases crept into the data when my subjects learned to identify what they called the Telltale Amway Aftertaste, a lingering cardboard bouquet with unmistakable PineSol inflections. Aftertaste aside, Amway food still rated low: Only the Critics’ Choice Cherry Flavored Toaster Pastries (a Pop-Tart analog) managed to eke into second-to-last place. The Goglonian Bagels were universally declared the worst ever experienced. And the Big Fiber Fudgies? Let’s just say that they were pretty much all Telltale Aftertaste.
By that point, Betsy DeVos was already a major Engler backer—she had served as the GOP chair in powerful Kent County, and in 1992, won one of the state’s seats on the RNC, ousting Ronna Romney (sister-in-law of Mitt Romney and mother of Ronna Romney McDaniel, whom Trump has chosen to helm the RNC). But education reform had long been a passion, and now she had an opportunity to help the governor who was enacting the changes she so badly wanted. 

Clockwise, from upper left: Amway cofounders Jay Van Andel (left) and Richard DeVos (center) meet in the Oval Office with President Gerald Ford, who is holding a copy of Richard’s book, “Believe!”; former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Richard DeVos during a 2009 event at the Scripps Research Institute; an aerial shot of Dick & Betsy DeVos’s primary residence in Ada, Michigan; Dick & Betsy enjoy their courtside seats at an Orlando Magic game—an NBA team owned by the DeVos family. | National Archives; AP; Getty Images
You will find yourself being sold a whole life policy by a friend who has one or two "brokers" that they work for, and unspoken is that some of the commission goes to this person - it's structured just like amway, the commissions flow up the chain. There's even an old joke built into the movie groundhog-day. "ned the head! Needlenose ned!" People who know people like ned realize that ned was probably very near killing himself before the main character bought a bunch of insurance from him.

Totally a scam...only a way to fetch money frm d people.. .people cant affors its products are so highly priced....bt den also...in logo ko kya...inhe to bs apna maal bechna h ...frr chahe insan apna ghar hi q na bech de...phle saamaan lene ko membership lene ko piche pde rhte h...fr use maintain krne ko...khud ko to koi kaam h nii...n jinhe kaam h wo inke chakkar me na kr pae...saale khud to sukoon ki jindgi jee re ho na...to dusro ko b to jeene do....
Here is my experience from amway. (spoiler, not good) I was an IBO and part of a business team for 2 years. went to 6 big conferences and really did my best to sell and share the opportunity. I ended up getting like 5 or 6 people in under me and then some under them. some people quit but I was sold on the dream. after the second year and time to renew I went over how much I spent every month compared to checks received from the company. I was getting anywhere from $40.00 a month to $200.00 but usually under $100.00. after the two years I was thousands in the negative. I thought would I want to get somebody just like me in the business? someone to go to the conferences, buy from themselves. at first I said yes but then I realized I would of sponsored a lot of hard working people and made them go broke. my uplined usually pressured me to drive a long way for meetings, buying stuff. all the events were super late and I was really sleep deprived. all of these are cult techniques. look it up.. do it.. I found that most people who are emeralds and diamonds make way more off the cd’s and events than even the amway part. usually if they share income it is there one best month but most the time I find they make crap. I wont go into details but I really didn’t want to continue. I went back to finish my degree (which my upline convinced me to quit school!!!) I got my degree. now just 2 years later I have actually doubled my income, met the most beautiful girl, Ukrainian girl with a perfect accent. she too was in amway and quit. I am working in a job in my degree field (server administration) and she actually started her own business. Amway had good business principles but you are much better off to go start a real business not a multi level marketing business in which you do more buying than selling and if you actually do selling you will need to sell a whole crap ton to get any money, in fact you will make more money working part time at mcdonalds than actually just selling amway products and I am guessing that is even if you get 15+ customers. do your research on where the top dogs are making money, then if you are in business yourself please recap your spending vs income and then question did my upline push me away from friends, family, or choices I would of done differently. If you spent the time to read this thank you as I kinda went long, I am so happy now and was only acting happy in amway as they say “fake it until you make it.”
To test these claims I took my new Amway wholesale price list down to the local supermarket for a price comparison. As it turned out, Amway wholesale prices were only slightly better than supermarket retail prices, although a few Amway products, like freezer bags, were significantly cheaper. And this was giving The Business the benefit of many doubts: I factored in its claim that its detergents are more “concentrated” than other brands; I compared Amway with high-quality brand-name products, not store brands or generics; and I compared only regular prices, ignoring the fact that the supermarket, unlike Amway, always has items on sale (not to mention coupons).[8] The same results obtained at the local drugstore in comparisons of vitamins and cosmetics. All in all, the 30 percent Basic Discount was nowhere to be found.[9]
Amway is a well established company. They have been around since 1959 and while rumors have suggested the possibility of an Amway Pyramid Scheme, I can say without a doubt the company is 100% credible and there is no Amway Pyramid Scheme to be concerned with. Amway distributors make money by selling real products and then they are paid a commission for selling those products and/or for recruiting others to sell the products. The only way this could be considered an Amway Pyramid Scheme is if money was just being passed around for the sake of passing money around, but the business is backed by strong products and a strong reputation.

Scott Coon (the millionaire from Seattle), on the other hand, was the genuine article: His breezy small talk projected an illusion of sincere interest, his well-fed face reflected self-assurance. Scott worked the small crowd with consummate slickness. After a mumbled intro from Josh (followed by whoops from the audience), Scott stood beaming at us, rubbing his hands in anticipation.
Studies of independent consumer watchdog agencies have shown that between 990 and 999 of 1000 participants in MLMs that use Amway-type pay plans in fact lose money.[115][116][citation needed] According to The Skeptic's Dictionary, "In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission requires Amway to label its products with the message that 54% of Amway recruits make nothing and the rest earn on average $65 a month."[117]
The houses in Carlton Estates were a magnitude above those in our old neighborhood, where all of the concrete homes followed more or less the same design. These sat on larger lots and had deeper lawns, and each was entirely unique. There were second and third stories, and sloping, multilevel roofs. There were bamboo thickets obscuring homes from the street. Stone and wood exteriors. Stained glass windows. No sidewalks. No streetlights.
Clockwise, from upper left: Amway cofounders Jay Van Andel (left) and Richard DeVos (center) meet in the Oval Office with President Gerald Ford, who is holding a copy of Richard’s book, “Believe!”; former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Richard DeVos during a 2009 event at the Scripps Research Institute; an aerial shot of Dick & Betsy DeVos’s primary residence in Ada, Michigan; Dick & Betsy enjoy their courtside seats at an Orlando Magic game—an NBA team owned by the DeVos family. | National Archives; AP; Getty Images 

2. Amway is notably owned by author and owner of Orlando Magic basketball team Rich Devos and Chairman of US Chamber of Commerce, Steve Van Andel. Pretty sure the government would not have the owner of an illegal pyramid scheme as their Chairman and could definitely find Mr Devos Courtside at a game to arrest him for his 11 billion dollar illegal business.
The centerpiece of any Rally is the life-story told by the guest of honor, emphasizing the depths of his pre-Amway rut and his resurrection through The Business. That evening’s featured guest, Executive Diamond Bill Hawkins, however, was too arrogant even to feign the requisite humility in his testimonial. He had been great all his life: a talented musician in one of Minneapolis’s best bands, a brilliant school teacher, a voracious reader, a charming companion with hundreds of loyal friends, and an unbelievably prodigious drinker of beer (about which he was now “ashamed”). When he saw The Plan and realized that he was much smarter than the guy showing it, he knew that his ship had finally come in: Here, at last, was something that would adequately reward his greatness[16].
From time to time the absurdities and contradictions of The Business would surface in Josh’s conversation. In one of his many unguarded moments, he voiced a preference for Amway Scrub Rite because it ran out more quickly than the “superconcentrated” Amway cleaners, enabling him to buy it more often. Catching himself, he quickly added, “Of course, it still lasts a long time.” This puzzled me. Why was Josh so eager to shovel money at Amway? The rational thing would be to minimize his own purchases while strong-arming his downlines into buying as much as possible. But, of course, if everyone did that, the whole business would evaporate. This is Amway’s central dilemma.
Amway is definitely not a get rich scheme or a pyramid based business. in the past they may have made errors like any company, but its not often that you come across a business that rewards you for your hard work. they are found on great moral principals and beliefs. the founders are marvelous people and the work they have done has brought financial freedom to many families. success in Amway does not come easy but you obtain a lot more than just money. Praise God for Amway and the education system that they have. with all respect to anyone who reads this.
And for those of us who had no taste for sales, Scott had fabulous news: A group of Amway millionaires had come up with a sure-fire system for making The Plan work—and had formed World Wide Dreambuilders LLC, a corporation independent of Amway, to teach that system to others. All that was required to ensure an Amwayer’s success, Dreambuilders taught, was that each distributor simply bought $100 of Amway products a month for his own “personal use.” That meant no high-pressure pitches, no Tupperware parties—no sales at all, in fact. You could meet your $100 monthly goal by selling to yourself—at 30 percent off retail to boot! Being an intensive Amway consumer was such a great deal that once we spread the word, our businesses would practically build themselves. We could quickly 6-4-2 to that extra $2,000, and once our six “legs” did likewise, we’d be pulling in $50,000 a month; if we included some other “factors,” more like $100,000! And that was just the beginning: There were some truly spectacular incomes to be made through The Business—which Scott would have told us about but for FTC regulations barring him from doing so.
One night, after he had taken me out to dinner (we went Dutch), Josh told me that there was a price list in the back of his car—sealed in an Amway Starter Kit. I could have it right away; I just had to give him the $160 fee to officially join Amway. Uncertain about taking the plunge, I claimed my checking account couldn’t cover $160 that week. That was all right, he insisted: I could write a post-dated check that he would hold until I gave the O.K. to deposit it. I still resisted, and he got out of the car with me, opening the hatch to show me the sealed white box within. Eventually, he settled for giving me a book called Being Happy, which he could later retrieve.
Amway is working on rainbow system. Which have some target nd purchasing the product every mnth. So its nt gud for distributers.. Day by day Company profit is up.. Nd distributar is going down.. Mlm is very good nd simple business for those who has self confidence. Nd want to achive our dreams. Bt before joining mlm chek all the theams.. M also lyk mlm bt nt rainbow system. M like matrix system coz not any target nd nt any time limit.. Nd secndly purchasing is only one time in life time. So change ur life wd mlm busines .
When a friend first presented the Amway business to Gomez, she admittedly wasn’t excited. “I was newly married, working three jobs and going to school,” she said. “I don’t do anything halfway, and so didn’t believe I had the time to devote to something new.” But when her husband, Adam, weighed the start-up cost against the potential to make additional money each month, she decided to come on board.
Amway today produces and distributes over 450 products produced in manufacturing facilities acros the U.S., China and India. It has a network of millions of “Independent Business Owners” (IBOs) in over 100 countries. For better or for worse, they have set the benchmark for all other MLMs, and are consistently one of the top MLM companies in the United States based on revenue.
I like the convenience that they offer. They have a wide variety of high quality products and their shipping is always on time. The layout of the website makes it quite easy to find the products I need and the specific package sizes that I am looking for. It would be good it they allowed for bundling certain items together in order to get a discount. They do it to a certain extent, but it would be great if they offer far more options and combinations. It was a clear, organized experience that made shopping quite enjoyable. Checking out was easy and the entire experience was hassle free.
Days after the 2012 election, Dick DeVos picked up the phone and rallied Republican lawmakers to pass right-to-work in lame duck while they still had the votes, reportedly promising financial support to those members who would find themselves facing tough reelections and suggesting he would back primary campaigns against those who didn’t step in line. “There’s one family who gets these people elected, and consequently, you can assume they can get them unelected, too,” says Gretchen Whitmer, who was the state Senate’s Democratic leader at the time.
In 2013 IBOs, people who qualified to be Business Consultants in the UK earned an average annual income of GBP21,048.  This falls short ofthe UK average annual income of GBP26,500.  It is however substantially better than those Amway IBOs who were not business consultants, as their average income for 2013 was less than GBP1,300 .We are not surprised, Amway has not made the 2013 Income Disclosure Statement  publicly available on their website.  However we  found a copy for you.
Rolling Stone's Bob Moser reported that former Amway CEO and co-founder Richard DeVos is connected with the Dominionist political movement in the United States. Moser states that DeVos was a supporter of the late D. James Kennedy, giving more than $5 million to Kennedy's Coral Ridge Ministries.[91][92][93] DeVos was also a founding member and two-time president of the Council for National Policy, a right-wing Christian organization.[94]
Amway and its founders have long had deep ties to the Washington D.C., and particularly the Republican Party. The current House basically has a minor Amway caucus with five former distributors and Amway has been one of the largest donors to the Republican Party since the early 1990s. DeVos’s son, Dick, ran for governor of Michigan in 2006 and his wife, Betsy, is currently the Secretary of Education in the first Trump administration. She has speculated that the DeVos family has donated around $200 million to Republican candidates.
Amway has one the world’s largest market shares for water treatment systems, which are widely purchased in Asian nations.  For these products, the reliability of the products is critical.  “In a direct sales business, an agent is selling their neighbors.” And for an Asian consumer, these are expensive products, from $600 to $1,000 dollars. “We don’t want our agents to have to explain why these products don’t work – so we do everything we can to make sure they keep working.” 

On the way out, we pass a frame on the wall bearing a quote by Robert Dedman Sr., founder of ClubCorp. My husband stops to read it: ‘‘A club is a haven of refuge and accord in a world torn by strife and discord. A club is a place where kindred spirits gather to have fun and make friends. A club is a place of courtesy, good breeding, and good manners. A club is a place expressly for camaraderie, merriment, goodwill, and good cheer. A club humbles the mighty, draws out the timid, and casts out the sorehead. A club is one of the noblest inventions of mankind.’’
This year’s report confirmed the desirability of starting a business falls with age. While the AESI is the same (58) for respondents under 35 years of age and those between the ages of 35 and 49, it is considerably lower (51) for respondents over 50 years old. The youngest age group surveyed demonstrated the strongest desire (68 percent) to start a business. This falls to 60 percent for the middle age group and 48 percent for the oldest group of respondents. Most interestingly, the feasibility of becoming an entrepreneur follows a different demographic pattern with respect to age. It is the lowest for the youngest respondents (58 percent) and highest for the middle-aged respondents (64 percent).
These businesses sell the hope of getting rich by recruiting recruiters to sell overpriced products that don't move in real markets. The products of any MLM have to be extremely cheap to manufacture and must retail at inflated, unrealistic prices because in effect, the products are simply used to move money into the pyramid scheme. Just remember that there are several hundred MLMs in existence in 2014 and all of them are scams.
I think there's a ton of misinformation on both parts. Yes, most people who jump into the business don't understand what they need to do to make their business successful. Then again, as mentioned above, MLM is a highly outdated model, pretty much just a good way to waste time when you could be using that time to retrain or pursue your passions. After all, what's the point in selling overpriced, under-quality product, and how can you expect to sell if you wouldn't buy it yourself?? I feel as though this system of marketing will die out fairly soon. Great post.
And then of course one question always comes up: ‘Should I even have this much wealth in the first place?’ I feel the Lord allocated some money for us to use for our pleasure, some for our ability to experience His world, some for investing to help create economic expansion and job opportunities for others – and of course, some for sharing with those who have a real need.
In the beginning, my parents put between ten and fifteen hours a week into their business – per the company’s recommendation. But over time, my dad’s enthusiasm began to wear off. ‘You say to yourself, ‘What the hell for?’’ he says now. ‘So that somebody can come in and then not return your calls? You take them to a meeting and there’s a jerk up there who’s embarrassing? I had no way, no avenue to get people in there and get them excited.’
Amway sells real products. They have cosmetics and regular household products. They also offer CDs, motivational material and other stuff to IBOs. There is a whole lot of purchases that go on involving IBOs, none of this is free for anybody. Some IBOs are able to make regular sales to people who take the products but have no affiliation to the company. IBOs that recruit people still have to sell stuff to the people they are recruiting. Some people become IBOs just to get the “discounted” prices.
In April 1997 Richard DeVos and his wife, Helen, gave $1 million to the Republican National Committee (RNC),[74][76] which at the time was the second-largest soft-money donation ever, behind Amway's 1994 gift of $2.5 million to the RNC.[74] In July 1997, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott and House Speaker Newt Gingrich slipped a last-minute provision into a hotly contested compromise tax bill that granted Amway and four other companies a tax break on their Asian branches that totaled $19 million.[74]
The largest training platform in Amway at the time of publishing this article is WWDB (WorldWide Dreambuilders, officially World Wide Group), which is a mirror image of BWW (Britt WorldWide). In fact, Ron Puryear visited Bill Britt to find out how he structured his training platform before founding the WWDB group. Although there are multiple training platforms inside Amway, WWDB happens to be the largest so I will only focus on their process here, although this can technically be looked at as an Amway BWW review as well. The cost incurred by partnering with any Amway training platform will be relatively the same.
Here is my experience from amway. (spoiler, not good) I was an IBO and part of a business team for 2 years. went to 6 big conferences and really did my best to sell and share the opportunity. I ended up getting like 5 or 6 people in under me and then some under them. some people quit but I was sold on the dream. after the second year and time to renew I went over how much I spent every month compared to checks received from the company. I was getting anywhere from $40.00 a month to $200.00 but usually under $100.00. after the two years I was thousands in the negative. I thought would I want to get somebody just like me in the business? someone to go to the conferences, buy from themselves. at first I said yes but then I realized I would of sponsored a lot of hard working people and made them go broke. my uplined usually pressured me to drive a long way for meetings, buying stuff. all the events were super late and I was really sleep deprived. all of these are cult techniques. look it up.. do it.. I found that most people who are emeralds and diamonds make way more off the cd’s and events than even the amway part. usually if they share income it is there one best month but most the time I find they make crap. I wont go into details but I really didn’t want to continue. I went back to finish my degree (which my upline convinced me to quit school!!!) I got my degree. now just 2 years later I have actually doubled my income, met the most beautiful girl, Ukrainian girl with a perfect accent. she too was in amway and quit. I am working in a job in my degree field (server administration) and she actually started her own business. Amway had good business principles but you are much better off to go start a real business not a multi level marketing business in which you do more buying than selling and if you actually do selling you will need to sell a whole crap ton to get any money, in fact you will make more money working part time at mcdonalds than actually just selling amway products and I am guessing that is even if you get 15+ customers. do your research on where the top dogs are making money, then if you are in business yourself please recap your spending vs income and then question did my upline push me away from friends, family, or choices I would of done differently. If you spent the time to read this thank you as I kinda went long, I am so happy now and was only acting happy in amway as they say “fake it until you make it.”
The more product sales they generate, the more income they can earn. Many also choose to build businesses by sharing the Amway opportunity with others and teaching them how to sell. This can mean greater reach for the product and ultimately higher income because of team sales volume.  In short, IBOs make money from the sale of our products – sales that they and the team they support generate.
The company has a lot of great products, shipping can take up to 5 days, but their guarantee is amazing. Compensation plan is second to none, but YOU NEED TO PUT IN WORK to make it actually work. If you are a go getter or ambitious, this is for you. If you aren't then probably not. Lot's of really great people and NEVER had a weird experience. Just business minded people who are looking to get ahead.
"Amway is my favourite company ever! It is very popular in my town and has a lot of experience, so I trust it completely. All of its products have high quality and are guaranteed to work well. If you have any problems with your purchase, you can send it back and get either another one or a refund. I like their customer service a lot. I have had issues several times but the representatives of the customer service helped me to resolve them really fast."
In the roughly two hundred pages of Cross’s book, however, there is virtually no discussion of how Amway actually works. Among entire chapters dedicated to Amway’s state-of-the-art manufacturing facilities and its pioneering move onto the World Wide Web, the ‘Amway Distributor Profile,’ its ‘Bootstraps Philosophy,’ and Amway’s foreign expansion strategy, the closest Cross comes to summarizing Amway’s business plan is in this passage:
The third way a distributor makes money is through earning commissions on group sales. "A Distributor may recruit a sales group and based on the success and productivity (as defined by product sales) of the sales group, a Distributor may earn commissions. It is important to note that a Distributor only earns commissions on the volume of Amway products actually sold," the Business Starter Guide points out.
"Amway differed in several ways from pyramid schemes that the Commission had challenged. It did not charge an up-front "head hunting" or large investment fee from new recruits, nor did it promote "inventory loading" by requiring distributors to buy large volumes of nonreturnable inventory," said Debra A Valentine, a general counsel for the FTC, in a seminar organised by the International Monetary Fund in May 1998.

Dick DeVos, on stage with his wife, echoed her sentiments with a lament of his own. “The church—which ought to be, in our view, far more central to the life of the community—has been displaced by the public school,” Dick DeVos said. “We just can think of no better way to rebuild our families and our communities than to have that circle of church and school and family much more tightly focused and built on a consistent worldview.”


The compensation plan is called a “stairstep breakaway,” which requires the business rep to effectively rebuild a leg once it has reached what’s called Platinum status (7500 points). Basically, legs break off once they qualify and the commissions turn into 4% royalties instead of commissioned payouts of ~30%. I asked a former Amway emerald once what it was like having his first leg break-off and his reply was: “it’s awful, you really know how to ask painful questions don’t you.” He went on to explain his commissions dropped by at least 80% when they turned into “royalties.” It should be noted that the royalties technically disappear if the volume in the leg drops below 7500 points, so it’s not really a “permanent” royalty unless you maintain your volume. It is in essence a “punishing” compensation plan that forces you to rebuild a leg once it reaches this trigger volume, effectively causing you to “not” want others to pass you up.
Yager made a name for himself as the father of the ‘Yager System,’ one of the first and most profitable motivational ‘tools’ businesses run by Amway distributors (also called ‘tools scams’ by detractors). Distributors produce motivational tapes and videos, or ‘tools,’ and sell them directly to their downlines for immediate profit. Tools promote Amway’s free market philosophy but are not themselves Amway products – though the Yager Group is still today an Amway-approved training provider. The Charlotte Observer has said of Yager, ‘He sells not only soap but an ideology and a way of life. Admirers speak of him with reverence, as if his next plateau of Amway achievement were sainthood itself.’ The title of Yager’s first book, Don’t Let Anybody Steal Your Dream, was a Gerard household motto. We said it to one another with a near-religious zeal – like we were speaking in high-fives. I still feel nostalgic for my childhood when I hear it.
Amway is haunted by the specter of saturation, the success that spells disaster. The 6-4-2 scenario tells it all: To keep one promise of $2,000-a-month, seventy-eight more need to be made whose fulfillment is still pending. The problem is that growth doesn’t improve this ratio: Were Amway to conquer the known universe, fewer than 2 percent of its distributors would be (or mathematically could be) Directs or higher. Of the rest, about 90 percent would be actively losing money—and without a pool of prospects to give them hopes for the future, they would surely quit. Amway would collapse from the bottom up.
In 2001, after the majority of Amway Independent Business Owners (IBOs) had transferred to the new company, Quixtar completely replaced Amway as the marketing venture for Amway/Alticor products in North American regions. The Quixtar business model differs from the earlier Amway business model in many aspects, such as the way distribution is performed as well as the products and services offered through partner stores. Rather than ordering product from a distributor who delivers them in person, Quixtar customers can place orders online and have the products shipped to them directly. In mid-2007 however, Quixtar announced they were phasing back in the Amway name over two years and discarding the Quixtar name. Along with the re-branding campaign, Amway Global is investing over 580 million dollars into both increased compensation for IBOs and for extensive advertising of the new brand name.[12]
If you think a lot of this smacks of a pyramid scheme, you’re not alone. In fact, the company was the subject of a 1979 Federal Trade Commission ruling that found Amway’s business practices to not be “inherently illegal,” though they were required to “cease price fixing and cease misrepresenting the apparent success achieved by the average distributor.”
The Coaches Poll began selecting the "Top 20" teams on a weekly basis during the 1950-1951 college football and basketball seasons. For the 1990-1991 football and basketball seasons, the poll expanded to a "Top 25," and it has retained this format since. It was initially published by United Press – known from 1958 as United Press International (UPI) – from 1950 thru 1990, followed by USA Today/CNN from 1991 thru 1996, USA Today/ESPN from 1997 to 2004, and USA Today from 2005 to the present.
I have not purchased anything from Amway in years, but I did like a number of their products. I particularly liked their cleaning supplies. I also think that Amway products were fairly high quality and had a good guarantee. I also think that Amway prices were fairly high. I would also prefer to order online than through a distributor, particularly a multi-level distributor who wants you to join their down-line marketing group. I had a fairly positive experience. The individual I ordered from was a personal friend, so we had a good relationship. She also gave me free samples of products so I could see if I liked them before I ordered them.
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