Though they aren’t quite as large or wealthy as the DeVoses, the Prince family—even further west, in Holland, Michigan—shares one big trait in common with their in-laws: the idea that patriotism and politics are inseparable from Christianity. Elsa Prince Broekhuizen, Betsy’s mother, donated $75,000 to the successful 2004 ballot measure to ban same-sex marriage in Michigan; four years later, she gave $450,000 to an identical initiative in California. Betsy’s brother, Erik Prince, founded Blackwater, the military contractor that gained notoriety in 2007, when its employees fired into a crowd of Iraqi civilians, killing 17. (In 2009, two former Blackwater employees alleged in federal court that Prince “views himself as a Christian crusader.”)
2. Amway is notably owned by author and owner of Orlando Magic basketball team Rich Devos and Chairman of US Chamber of Commerce, Steve Van Andel. Pretty sure the government would not have the owner of an illegal pyramid scheme as their Chairman and could definitely find Mr Devos Courtside at a game to arrest him for his 11 billion dollar illegal business.
Its funny that you should say that because, in my opinion I don't think MLM is going anywhere and the Amway Corporation definitely isn't going anywhere. since the depression in 2008 amway has increased its annual revenue by 1 billion dollars a year, and today stands at 11.8 billion dollars. Now your entitled to your opinion but there are some little facts that all people should be informed of. such as the fact that if your between the ages of 18 and 32, by the time you reach retirement (working a job) you have an 80% chance of being dead, disabled, broke, or financially dependent upon the government to subsidize your income. also by that time statistically you will have changed jobs 32 times. how much do you really think your 401k is really going to worth then. Im just a messenger her but I think a company like Amway is really the best shot any average Joe has of creating financial independence. I love when people say its a pyramid scheme. lets look at the typical job. (trading time for money) who works harder, stock boy at A&P or the CEO at A&P who's probably sitting in his hot tub right now? Obviously the stock boy but no matter how hard the stock boy works he will never out earn the CEO. that in my mind is a pyramid scheme. at least in Amway if you do more work you get more money. But the fact still remains it is not a get rich quick scheme. Its going to take hard works. Lots of hard work. but take it from someone who has worked his way through this system. it is well worth the effort. the ends justify the means because once you make to the top of that system Amway provides you with a life that is unparalleled by any other lifestyle. Its not easy but it does work. 

So why do we see so many scam reviews and unhappy members that smear Amway in a bad way? Quite simple – MLM is one of the most difficult methods of earning, and you will have to do some hard work and teach yourself some proper marketing skills in order to go far in this industry. Many people find it difficult to communicate with other people face to face or voice to voice. Cold calling is necessary with MLM if you want to make money. If you have a fear of that then the opportunity is simply going to waste your efforts and money period.
Let us not underestimate the power of ideas. Cross provides examples of distributors who let nothing stand in their way. Just listen to the story of the Upchurch family, who persisted in Amway, making any sacrifices necessary, even after Hurricane Fran destroyed their home. Or the Janzes, who were desperately poor new parents with another child on the way when they learned that Amway was bigger than making money; it was a way to overhaul your lifestyle and live your dreams. Or Dexter Yager, who didn’t let a stroke stop him from achieving success with Amway and continued to operate his business at the same level even as he was learning to walk and speak again.

It was very good at the beginning, loved the selection. The products went a long way, they were very effective and did the job, I loved the personal interaction with the distributor, things came on time and full order. However, products were not cost effective, they were very expensive to ship and the constant pressure to become a distributor was unnerving. I just wanted to buy the products annually.
I was invited by a gentlemen from eastern Suffolk area, NY and had told him I was busy in other things. What I didn't realize was how I had went to see this same presentation in someone's house about 20 years prior to 2015. So it was May 2015 and people want to return to the American dream and here comes these floating characters straight out of a horror video game. So they smiled their way and have their game plans down to a science. There's no way I'm going to sit through a presentation that makes me feel I am chained down in my seat 24/7.

I have no boss. I am president & CEO. I am a real business owner — as in, I own every part of this business. I create the products. I do not peddle toilet paper or hand soap to my friends and family so I can make pennies on their subscription fees. I have to actually think up something new, produce it, market it, and sell it. You want to be paid for performance? Create something yourself, and then see how you do. That’s the most honest measure. Can you make six- or seven-figures from your own creativity and grit? We’ll never know, you’re too busy drinking the Amway kool-aid and patting yourself on the back for being a “business owner” even though you do not own Amway and can’t really see you’re doing what you hate — making someone else rich — even though it’s right in front of you.


Scott spent the first hour explaining America’s economic crisis, which is rooted in a betrayal stretching back to the late nineteenth century. See, that’s when big corporations, with the help of government-run public education, first convinced Americans to abandon their entrepreneurial instincts and accept jobs. Before that, everyone was either a small-business owner or apprenticing to be one; afterwards, it was all about benefits packages. Emasculated by wage slavery, Americans had muddled along fairly well until, as stagflation rent the land in the 1970s, we realized in horror that mere wages were helpless against “exponentially expanding” costs.

During the registration process for a new IBO, Quixtar contracts clearly inform prospective IBOs that BSM are optional and that the producers and sellers of the BSM may make profit or loss from their sale (like any other business).[17] This is also publicized on Quixtar websites.[51] Quixtar's Business Support Materials Arbitration Agreement (SMAA) requires the immediate seller of BSMs to buy-back materials, which were purchased only for personal consumption within a 180-day time frame, on commercially reasonable terms, upon request of the purchaser. BSMs purchased for inventory or to be sold to others downline are not covered by the buy back policy.[10]

Let me share my experience. My son has completely been brainwashed by up line who has instructed him not to associate with his mother and father. His up line (the leader) gives the entire group instructions on what they have to do, when, how many meetings per weeks, hours of involvement. They also participate at conventions by the Diamond leaders who on the last day start preaching and have people go down forth to donate. Alan is a phony and fraud. Had no substance to his ramblings on stage then that pathetic sermon he entised sleep deprived individuals to donate. It doesn't stop there. My son and his wife have spent thousands of dollars in 2 years on Amway products and LTD products. They are instructed to do so. Sir, anyone who takes up for the cult like group should be ashamed. My son calls his Platinum leader his mentor whom he has ripped him apart through Identity Destruction. OMG...my son has a masters degree and this has ripped my heart completely out of my chest. I do not even know who he is anymore and I wish I could do something legally about this. You have no clue how they twist the bible, construe it into something they want the group to believe. Now my Christian son and daughter n law have stopped going to church and are worshipping the way the AMWAY LEADERS tell them to worship and their belief system. In the beginning I saw a drastic behaviour change, then a chill period. I even gave him my support, although against it, 100%. Helped their sales and reached out of o my friends who purchased. No more. I've not said anything hing about it to him but because my motherly instinct told me he was instructed to cut ties, that was confirmed today. His up line Joel should be sued for ripping our family apart. People like that are sinning and driven by money. The worship money and material things Of the world. There is only one God. I'm extremely upset and am just letting him go do it. He's under so much pressure stressed d out all the time. They are both coaches and thus side deal is killing them. The end
In September 2006, following a public complaint, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana state police (CID) initiated raids and seizures against Amway distributors in the state, and submitted a petition against them, claiming the company violated the Prize Chits and Money Circulation Schemes (banning) Act.[118] They shut down all corporate offices associated with the Amway organization including the offices of some Amway distributors. The enforcement said that the business model of the company is illegal.[11][119] The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) had notified the police that Amway in India may be violating certain laws regarding a "money circulation scheme" and the IB Times article writes that "some say ... Amway is really more about making money from recruiting people to become distributors, as opposed to selling products".[11] In 2008, the state government of Andhra Pradesh enacted a ban on Amway media advertisements.[118]

Beginning in 1992–93, USA Today and CNN took over publishing the coaches' basketball poll for UPI. Beginning in the 1993–94 basketball season, the Coaches Poll began publishing its final poll after the NCAA basketball tournament. From the 1993 to 1997 seasons, the poll was co-sponsored by USA Today, Cable News Network, and the NABC. Finally, in 1997-98, ESPN joined as a co-sponsor of the Coaches Poll along with USA Today and the NABC where selected NABC members serve as the voting block for the poll. ESPN retains its involvement in the basketball poll despite no longer being involved in the football poll.

The top four teams remained the same, with No. 1 Alabama continuing to receive 61 of 64 first-place votes after the Crimson Tide cruised past Arkansas. Georgia retained the No. 2 spot after taking down Vanderbilt. No. 3 Ohio State overcame a sluggish start to put away Indiana and retained one No. 1 vote. Fourth-ranked Clemson, retaining two No. 1 nods, also held steady after its most lopsided result of the season at Wake Forest.
To understand the DeVos family, it helps to understand West Michigan. A sweeping landscape of flat, rolling farmland freckled with small towns, it sits on the opposite side of the state—in more than one way—from the big, diverse, reliably Democratic Detroit metropolitan area. Broadly speaking, it’s a region where people are deeply religious, politically conservative, entrepreneurial and unfailingly polite—think Utah, if it were settled not by Mormons but by Dutch Calvinists. “There’s an old expression here,” chuckles Gleaves Whitney, director of the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids. “‘If you ain’t Dutch, you ain’t much.’”
Qualifying for compensations needs more quantity compared to the majority of various other companies, this keeps new suppliers at a loss for a longer period of time. In order to qualify for a paycheck a rep have to do 100PV per month. This would not be such a large deal if the average factor wasn't somewhere around $3.00. This implies new distributors have to move $300.00 a month in quantity to get paid. Typically, most other business can be found in someplace around $1.10 to $1.50 per factor, meaning the brand-new rep would only need to move $110.00 to $150.00 or so per month to qualify.
I had a very good experience with Amway. They have very nice people on website to help you, the employees know about all of the products that they sell. This probably one of the reasons they have been in business for so long. Also, they are a very good company that has top quality products. Amway probably has a large amount of orders to handle every day. However, the prices are very high on most products. They can probably keep the prices this high because all of the people that buy their products are used to paying the higher prices for wonderful products.

If choosing a multi-level marketing business with a proven track record of sales is important to you, Amway will most likely be in your top three MLM companies to sell for.  Amway is also more forgiving to people who do not receive the experience they expected when signing up with the health and beauty company. Distributors have a money-back guarantee which gives them time to decide if Amway fits their needs. However, Amway is not foreign to lawsuits and questions of the integrity of its business practices. What do we suggest? Compare Amway to other multi-level marketing companies and how they best meet your personal goals and values. Also consider whether or not you want to be associated with a company who has settled in court due to pyramid scheme accusations.
In 2001 a regional court ruled in favor of Network 21; however, in 2004 the Warsaw Regional Court dismissed Amway's civil lawsuit. On appeal Amway won the case and the producers were ordered to pay a fine to a children's charity and publish a public apology.[155][156] As of 2009 the film was still banned due to an ongoing case brought by "private individuals" ridiculed in the film.[157]
“This is an extremely contentious, controversial business model,” business consultant and author Robert L. FitzPatrick told the Detroit Free Press in 2006. “If you go to work for Hewlett-Packard, you don’t walk in the door saying, ‘Hey, I wonder if this is a scam?’ But anybody who gets into multilevel marketing will have to deal with that question.”
It is rare to see poverty mentioned in Amway’s literature. When it is, it’s usually in the context of an Amway distributor having escaped it. Success is equated with wealth. With wealth is promised an enhanced way of life, one crafted of your own dreams – and Amway gives you The Plan to achieve that life. To let your attention stray from The Plan is to invite doubt and negative thinking, which can only result in failure. ‘As successful distributors tell people they are recruiting, the pursuit of excellence can be achieved only when they discipline themselves to tune in the positive dialogues and tune out the negative ones,’ says Cross. Poverty makes us feel bad. Feeling bad is negative. Negativity causes failure. It makes poverty feel contagious. So don’t think about it.
They encourage new participants to start eating healthy and work-out — big surprise, taking care of yourself feels good — however, those who have been in a funk for a long time might attribute their new health and self-esteem boost to Amway rather than positive diet and lifestyle changes. Then they have recruits set goals, make vision boards, and sell them on the dream that they’ll “be retired in 2 to 5 years”. Amway is a pyramid scheme, but it’s masked under the real positive live changes subscribers make.

Thanks for the information on these company. I have been scam by a company Named Creative Stream or AKA Private Community Creative Enterprises, or AKA CEP Community. They promise to give you money if you recruit people into the company. Get 6 to 8 people get 6 figure salary. They claim an investor was placing the money in a money market account that increase our income. The conference calls had over a thousand people on the line waiting for their return of investment. They even came to the state I live in and did a meeting to confirm they were legit. People took picture of them and with them. I join in September of 2012. The money they took was over $700,000 to $800,000 maybe more. that amount I'm aware of. There were policemen and other people with degrees that got scammed. BE Aware of this company. You can contact me if you have any additional questions.

We also were in business in Amway and we DID make money.  We worked hard and earned it.  BUT, as with any business, especially a direct marketing, we had uplines (the people above us) who were cheats and liars and only wanted money for themselves, not others.  They in effect, stopped us at a certain level from making anymore money.  We changed to a different group, but by then our dynamic was gone and we couldn't do much.  As with any business, NOT just Amway, you have to deal with people.  And THAT is the problem.  My husband got tired of fighting and not getting anywhere and he quit.  I am still in it because, let's face it, the products ARE the BEST.  We started sometime around 1986.  We met some fantastic people, we had the time of our lives, and it WAS our life.  I missed it terribly, and I still miss alot of those people.  But through it, we came away with MANY many good things learned, and still do have some very close friends from it.  My upline now is my VERY best friend in the world, more like a sister.  We are older now and have plenty of money for ourselves, so our interest is not in making money at this point, but simply living our wonderful lives now.  If you are out to make money, you CAN do it in Amway.  But the right way is the way to do it.  Don't cheat, be good to your people, and really believe in what you have and what you can do.

In Western Michigan, what matters isn’t how Amway is run, but what the DeVoses have done for the community. Drive through downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan’s second-largest metropolis, and the family’s contributions are omnipresent. There’s the Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital. A few blocks west, hugging the Grand River that bisects the city, you’ll find the sleek DeVos Place Convention Center, the DeVos Performance Hall and the Amway Grand Plaza Hotel. Across the water, the campus of Grand Valley State University is anchored by the spacious Richard M. DeVos Center. A few blocks north is the DeVos Learning Center, housed at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum. (You would be forgiven if you assumed that DeVos, not Ford, had been president.)

This is not the man who brought my dad in but a man somewhere above him. He was what The Business calls a ‘phony Emerald.’ To meet the criteria for the pin level, he’d force the people in his organization to order extra product in order to grow his volume and push him across the finish line each month – not that he turned much of a profit doing so, as he had to pass it all on to his own upline. ‘Well, the Emerald pin doesn’t mean anything unless your organization is solid,’ said my dad. ‘So you got a pin – you’re not making the money.’ Eventually, my dad says, Vincent was stripped of the Emerald pin because he couldn’t maintain the sales by force alone.


‘As long as you’re a golf member, you’re open to playing all the tournaments and games,’ Dale says to me. ‘There’s something for the ladies, and then if couples play together, we have a couples’ golf on Sundays. We have a senior group, and then a young under-forty-year-old guy group.’ He shows me a schedule pinned to a corkboard near the door. ‘These are kind of the core golf groups. And then we have a formal Men’s Golf Association as well, one tournament per month. If they win that tournament, there are parking spots up for grabs, if you want a nice parking spot – or some trophies. You know, when you love a game and you watch it on TV, to be able to still play it and go out there with a large group of guys, and then win a tournament? These guys are having a blast. They feel like they’re on the PGA Tour. That’s what it’s all about.’
From the beginning, designers focused on creating a sustainable site; providing water efficiency; optimizing energy and atmosphere protection; conserving materials and resources; monitoring indoor environmental quality and health; and selecting environmentally preferred operations and maintenance. These elements combine to create one of the most environmentally friendly, high-performing professional arenas in the country. 

There were some rational explanations for Josh’s behavior. To recruit others, he needed the propaganda talents of his upline World Widers, who made it clear that their underlings had to be “fanatical about personal use,” and even held this up as an index of a distributor’s positive attitude. Another rationale was provided by the well-worn anecdote, often retold in the first person, about the distributor who missed a new Performance Bracket by a few dollars when a little bit more personal use could have taken them over the edge. The story always ended, “Well, you better believe I never made that mistake again!”
There are some one and a quarter million Amway members in the United States, roughly one for every two hundred of the rest of us, all of them eager to spread the gospel of salvation-through-selling-Amway-products. Considering Amwayers’ penchant for compiling long lists of names, accosting strangers, and generally striving to collapse the degrees of separation between them and other humans, the chances of an American being asked to an Amway meeting are quite good—somewhere between having a condom break during sex and being dealt a straight in a hand of poker. For a certain segment of the struggling middle class, where there’s a magic mixture of disposable income and status insecurity, the odds are nearer those of catching a cold. And for someone like me, a post-collegiate pre-professional with a solid future in temping, Amway is more or less a mandatory rite of passage.

In the 1990s, the Amway organization was a major contributor to the Republican Party (GOP) and to the election campaigns of various GOP candidates. Amway and its sales force contributed a substantial amount (up to half) of the total funds ($669,525) for the 1994 political campaign of Republican congresswoman and Amway distributor Sue Myrick (N.C.).[73] According to two reports by Mother Jones magazine, Amway distributor Dexter Yager "used the company's extensive voice-mail system to rally hundreds of Amway distributors into giving a total of $295,871" to Myrick's campaign.[73][74] According to a campaign staffer quoted by the magazine, Myrick had appeared regularly on the Amway circuit, speaking at hundreds of rallies and selling $5 and $10 audiotapes.[73] Following the 1994 election, Myrick maintained "close ties to Amway and Yager", and raised $100,000 from Amway sources, "most notably through fundraisers at the homes of big distributors", in the 1997–98 election cycle.[74]


Their vertically integrated supply chain is one of longest in the industry. In addition to running plants, they own organic farms. They have farms in Brazil, Mexico, and the state of Washington where they grow and harvest key botanical ingredients like echinacea, spinach, alfalfa, watercress, and cherries.  They then take those products and manufacture intermediates.  Cherries, for example, are processed for Vitamin C. These intermediates they both use in their own products and sell to other companies.
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