Thanks to the DeVoses, Michigan’s charter schools enjoy a virtually unregulated existence. Thanks to them, too, the center of the American automotive industry and birthplace of the modern labor movement is now a right-to-work state. They’ve funded campaigns to elect state legislators, established advocacy organizations to lobby them, buttressed their allies and primaried those they disagree with, spending at least $100 million on political campaigns and causes over the past 20 years. “The DeVos family has been far more successful not having the governor’s seat than if they had won it,” says Richard Czuba, the owner of the Glengariff Group, a bipartisan polling firm in Michigan. “They have, to some degree, created a shadow state party. And it’s been pretty darn effective.”

So you say you are successful at it. What level are you at, how many down lines do you have, how many friends have you lost, how many hours per week to you put into it after you have worked your full time job. What $ amount do you spend per month on products for your up line which inevitably reduces any bonus you made that month. If everyone that says they are successful would please answer these questions I do believe the truth will come out. My sons up line make it to platinum in 7 long years of tireless long hours. His group consists of rather low class individuals, quite uneducated. He has been at Platinum 6 years. He also instincts no tv, no sports, no social media. He wanted everyone on the bus to make each 100 phone calls. I thought I was going to come unglued on him trying to dictate his orders. You tell me...Is it worth loosing your entire friendships you have had for many years, lost relationships with family, constant stress and demands from up line to boost his bonus, juggling a coaching job, putting all pressures on wife to micro manage everything and do to her stress after coaching all day she has list and enormous amount of weight to a size 00. My son only 28 had developed wrinkles, very noticeable in 2 years. At the cost of all that for $500 a month extra income but yet they spend over that in product each month. It's totally insane. Look to each there own. I tried it but the convention in Kentucky was what complet turned me off. Dead head from Dallas, one stop for gas. No sleep, run to Friday night meeting. Up till 3 then back up at 6:00. And it just wasn't me not getting any sleep. This is how they hook you because you can not think rational being sleep deprived. Packed weekend with meeting from Diamond leaders that had nothing intelligent to speak about. Then the Sunday morning sermon comes. So ok, I go along for a bit but the ploy to have people go down firth, he is not an ordained minister, started trying to sleek in tongue. I totally walked out went back to the hotel lobby and was angry. It felt like they were playing with my intelligence. Now where do you think those donations those poor suckers fave, why lined in his pockets of course. The tickets, bus, hotel cost over $400 plus snack, drinks etc. I wasn't stupid enough to buy into the KTD materials but if course son and daughter n law did. They go to 3 conferences a year. For what. Listen to a woman Brahe about her mansion, 7 bathrooms. $4000 pots on her front porch. Yeh the say they made it to the big time but in reality most don't. No way in gods green earth would I waste Moët that frigiously. Not to mention 7 Arabian horses. Who doesn't want to be rich. I just not a conformist to be dictated to what my religious beliefs should be. They twist every in the bible and demand the group(new family) to followvstrictsborders from Plat leader. All he does is warp people's minds, tear them down and mold them into mini Joel. That's brainwashing and it is against the law. Before its all said and done I'm bringing him down for the the turmoil he has put my son in and pain he had caused me. It's not suppose to be be like that but what I saw was nothing short of what a. I hope someone reapeobs
The Orlando City Council approved several operating agreements connected with the arena plans on May 22, 2007.[13] The City Council approved the plan officially, 6-1, on July 23.[14] The Venue plan received final approval by the Orange County Board of County Commissioners, 5-2, in late evening of July 26 after a long day of public hearings.[15] Amendments were made by the County Commission which were approved on August 6 by the City Council, 6-1, sealing the deal once and for all. On December 1, 2007, the City and the Magic came to an agreement on nearly $8.5 million in compensation to three owners of the land where the arena is planned to be built. An eminent domain hearing confirmed the agreement and finalized the sale.[16]
Betsy’s campaigning earned the attention of the Ford team, which tapped her to attend that year's Republican National Convention in Kansas City as a participant in the “Presidentials” program for young Republicans. The budding politicos attended training on campaign strategy and political techniques, and were divided into groups based on geography so that they could get acquainted with potential allies from their home states. There were also more practical desires for a squadron of young volunteers at a contested convention: “Anywhere there needed to be noise, there were always kids,” Betsy Prince told a reporter for the Holland Sentinel in 1976 (“Betsy Helps Cheer Ford Through in Kansas City,” read the headline, beside a photo of a T-shirt-clad Betsy sporting a feathered, Farrah Fawcett-lite hairdo).
Thanks to the DeVoses, Michigan’s charter schools enjoy a virtually unregulated existence. Thanks to them, too, the center of the American automotive industry and birthplace of the modern labor movement is now a right-to-work state. They’ve funded campaigns to elect state legislators, established advocacy organizations to lobby them, buttressed their allies and primaried those they disagree with, spending at least $100 million on political campaigns and causes over the past 20 years. “The DeVos family has been far more successful not having the governor’s seat than if they had won it,” says Richard Czuba, the owner of the Glengariff Group, a bipartisan polling firm in Michigan. “They have, to some degree, created a shadow state party. And it’s been pretty darn effective.”

This is not the man who brought my dad in but a man somewhere above him. He was what The Business calls a ‘phony Emerald.’ To meet the criteria for the pin level, he’d force the people in his organization to order extra product in order to grow his volume and push him across the finish line each month – not that he turned much of a profit doing so, as he had to pass it all on to his own upline. ‘Well, the Emerald pin doesn’t mean anything unless your organization is solid,’ said my dad. ‘So you got a pin – you’re not making the money.’ Eventually, my dad says, Vincent was stripped of the Emerald pin because he couldn’t maintain the sales by force alone.
This collective approach is how the family runs their home lives, too. The DeVoses’ myriad properties are managed through a single private company, RDV Corporation, which both manages the family’s investments and operates as a home office, paying the family’s employees, maintaining the DeVoses’ residences and assuring them as frictionless a life as possible. (The duties outlined by one recent property-manager job with RDV Corporation include “ensur[ing] doors are well-oiled to avoid squeaking” and that “broken toys [are] repaired or disposed of.”)

Imagine that you’ve struck a deal with a company to give you discounts for buying in bulk: If you buy $100 worth of stuff, they’ll send you a 3 percent rebate. For $300 or more, it goes up to 6 percent, $600 or more, 9 percent, and so on up to $7,500 and 25 percent. Now, let’s say you’re unable to spend more than $100 a month, but manage to get seventy-four other people to go in with you. Together, you spend $7,500 and divide up the 25 percent rebate. Everyone saves money, and the rebate is shared equally. That’s the idea behind a consumer co-op or wholesale buying club.
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