This said, according to Inter@ctive Week, "The commissions aren't all that great, even though they can add up to greater than 50 percent of the cost of the goods sold. If privately held Amway generated $6 billion in sales in 1998 as estimated, then each of its 1 million distributors would have pulled in, on average, only $6,000. It's nice extra income, but a livelihood only for the most talented, hardworking or aggressive. Or, for those with a large personal family tree.

The houses in Carlton Estates were a magnitude above those in our old neighborhood, where all of the concrete homes followed more or less the same design. These sat on larger lots and had deeper lawns, and each was entirely unique. There were second and third stories, and sloping, multilevel roofs. There were bamboo thickets obscuring homes from the street. Stone and wood exteriors. Stained glass windows. No sidewalks. No streetlights.
I have heard India has banned 6 of amways product. But I am not sure which one's are they. Guys could any one please tell me if Amway's protein powder is also included in the banned list, As I am taking it as a protein supplement. I also just saw a nice review video and thought its good, but I still dont want to be consuming a banned product.. review video I am referring to is http://amwaynutrilitedaily.com/amway-nutrilite-protein-powder/amway-protein-powder/

Enter Jay Van Andel, Amway’s other cofounder. Jay had a 1929 Model A, which Rich had noticed both driving down his street and also parked outside his high school. ‘I thought a ride in this car would surely beat the bus, a streetcar, or walking,’ says Rich. The rest is as saccharine as you would expect: good American boys working hard to make their dreams come true – an adventure full of family values and sturdy bootstraps with which one can pull himself up. It begins with the heartwarming story of their first joint business venture, running a pilot school, then segues into a comedy-of-errors trip on a sailboat – a typical masculine coming-of-age experience rooted in good old-fashioned American values like cooperation, perseverance, and leadership.
An old friend and her husband asked if they could catch up as we hadn’t seen each other for a while….well, they showed up with their Amway upliner and tried to rope us into joining…my husband, trying not to smile too much mentioned the pic they were showing us was actually a pyramid on it’s side! The upliner got antsy and said he was making 6 figures. I asked him if he was, why did he have holes in the soles of his shoes and drove a bomb to our house? Haven’t seen those old friends since, funny. I felt like I had brushed of leeches who wanted to suck any money I had into their “business”. Problem with Amway, it IS a pyramid scheme and the money is funneled straight to the top. Last I heard these people had purchased a caravan and were driving interstate to meet new people in the hopes of roping them in! They spend all their savings,tried to scam their friends and made nothing……
I asked him when he thought he'd reach that stage himself, after all he was spending a Wednesday evening trying to sell the system to me, plus he was still working a normal job.  I explained that for him Amway was not yet in the business owner quadrant,  it was in the self employed quadrant.  In Amway he didn't have a boss and he could work his own hours, but his income was not passive.  In the cast of this meeting, and I'm sure many others, he put in hours of work for absolutely no income.
Dreambuilders’ impact on Sherri’s life was far less salutary. Its most tangible financial effect was the used car she had bought with Josh’s advice, which came complete with a weird smell and a glove compartment that didn’t close. But Sherri felt that she had undergone a profound psychic transformation. “Before Amway,” she would say, “I just wasn’t thinking!” Her new clarity made her scornful of mass pursuits: When the E2020 staff went to a Cubs game, she could hardly believe that people would waste their time that way. (Josh counseled her to just sit next to strangers and mingle.) Her “j-o-b,” even with a promotion to Internet Expert, certainly didn’t interest her anymore: She wanted to spend the whole day talking about The Business.[14] And she now regarded unambitious co-workers, family, and friends as, in Scott Coon’s words, “slugs.”
Scott confidently reprised decades’ worth of conservative alarmism, invoking inflation and national debt and other flat-earth bugbears in a doomsday routine as charmingly archaic as it was fatuous. An accurate narrative of the last few decades—growing productivity, GDP, and per-capita income, accompanied by a massive upward redistribution of wealth—would hardly have packed the millennial portent Scott was looking for. The Second Wave, like Communism, like all the works of man, was destined to decay and collapse, making way for the coming entrepreneurial kingdom—which, for those who lacked faith or zeal, would bring a day of reckoning. Were we ready? To prove he “wasn’t making this crazy stuff up,” he littered the floor with copies of Fortune, Money, and Forbes, citing the relevant disaster stories. I felt like I was back at ENTERPRISE 2020.
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